Guest Lecture by Dr. Jay Grymes

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Dr. Grymes will give a lecture co-hosted by the Holocaust Education Resource Council of the FSU College of Social Work and the FSU Society for Musicology on Thursday, October 10th, 2019, from 4-5pm in Longmire Recital Hall. The lecture is titled “‘Although Music Here is Chronic, Many Lives are Disharmonic’: Cabaret Songs as Discord to the Harmonizing Narrative of Theresienstadt.”

Please join us for this event!

About Dr. Grymes:

James A. Grymes is an internationally respected musicologist, a critically acclaimed author, and a dynamic speaker who has addressed audiences at significant public venues such as Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), and the historic 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, AL. Dr. Grymes has been featured in interviews by the New York Times, ABC News, and CNN, and has written essays for the Huffington Post and the Israeli music magazine Opus.

He is the author of Violins of Hope: Instruments of Hope and Liberation in Mankind’s Darkest Hour (Harper Perennial, 2014). A stirring testament to the strength of the human spirit and the power of music, Violins of Hope tells the remarkable stories of violins played by Jewish musicians during the Holocaust, and of the Israeli violinmaker dedicated to bringing these inspirational instruments back to life. Violins of Hope won a National Jewish Book Award.

Dr. Grymes is Professor of Musicology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He is represented by John Rudolph of Dystel, Goderich & Bourret.

For more information, see http://www.jamesagrymes.com/about-james-a-grymes/.

Guest Lecture by Dr. Mark Anthony Neal

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Please join the Society for Musicology in welcoming Dr. Mark Anthony Neal to the Florida State University’s College of Music! On Thursday, September 26, from 4:00-5:00pm in the Longmire Recital Hall (LON 201), Dr. Neal will be presenting a talk entitled “‘I’ll Be a Bridge: Black Interiority, Black Invention and the American Songbook.” A reception will follow the talk, which is free and open to the public.

About Dr. Neal: 
Mark Anthony Neal is Chair of the Department of African & African American Studies and the founding director of the Center for Arts, Digital Culture and Entrepreneurship (CADCE) at Duke University where he offers courses on Black Masculinity, Popular Culture, and Digital Humanities, including signature courses on Michael Jackson & the Black Performance Tradition, and The History of Hip-Hop, which he co-teaches with Grammy Award Winning producer 9th Wonder (Patrick Douthit).

He also co-directs the Duke Council on Race and Ethnicity (DCORE).

He is the author of several books including What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Black Public Culture (1999), Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic (2002) and Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities (2013). The 10th Anniversary edition of Neal’s New Black Man was published in February of 2015 by Routledge. Neal is co-editor of That’s the Joint: The Hip-Hop Studies Reader (Routledge), now in its second edition. Additionally Neal is host of the video webcast Left of Black, which is produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke. You can follow him on Twitter at @NewBlackMan.